Comment suffragettes-terrorists

Published on May 20th, 2015 | by Nicole Archer

26

The One In Three Campaign is Bollocks, and Here is Why   

A particular myth surrounding domestic violence has taken hold over the last several years, infiltrating our news feeds and warping views. This myth has been quoted in the Sydney Morning Herald, Q&A, and is the basis of a Senate inquiry into domestic violence. It claims that one in three victims of domestic violence are male, and it is completely and utterly wrong.

This claim first appeared on the Men’s Rights Activist website, One in Three. The One in Three Campaign describes themselves as a “diverse group of men and women” (which I imagine to be a group of crying babies), which aim to raise awareness about domestic violence against males. Though as UOW’s own Dr. Michael Flood puts it, they are essentially a “campaign against efforts to address men’s violence against women”. On the website, the Campaign cites the Australian Bureau of Statistic’s 2006 Personal Safety Survey (PSS) and “family conflict” studies as their main sources.

Statistics, Sweet Statistics 

The PSS gives us an idea of the number of men and women who have experienced physical aggression by a heterosexual partner or an ex-partner. However, the PSS does have some limitations. Despite this, the PSS is clear on several things:

  • Men are twice as likely than women to experience at least one incident of violence (10.8% of men vs. 5.8% of women)
  • Both men and women are most at risk from violence from other men
  • Women make up 78%, and men 22%, of victims of physical assault by a current or former partner in the last year.
  • Women are far more likely to experience violence, physical and sexual assault, from current or former partners than men.
  • Out of those who had experienced violence from a partner, women were more likely to experience anxiety or fear during the relationship.

If we were to take these figures at face value, it would appear that men make up nearly one quarter of victims of physical assault by current of former partners. In order to further understand these figures, we need to look at how the PSS is limited as a marker of domestic violence.

Domestic violence is commonly defined as a systematic pattern of power and control exerted by one person against another, involving a variety of physical and non-physical tactics of abuse and coercion, in the context of a current or former intimate relationship.  However, the PSS mainly looks at physical and sexual assault in terms of “acts”: being pushed, slapped, grabbed, stabbed or shot. The survey does not distinguish whether these “acts” were a one off occurrence, or part of the systematic pattern of power and control. The PSS does not tell us if these acts of violence were in self-defence or if they caused injury. By using such a narrow definition, the PSS essentially groups all “violent acts” together, from tickle fight injuries to violence borne out of power and control. Because of this acts base approach, and limited definition, Dr. Flood writes, results tend to produce “claims of gender symmetry and equivalence”.

However, when we look at results from other approaches, we see clear differences in men and women’s uses of intimate partner violence. Women are much more likely to be subjected to frequent, prolonged, and extreme violence. Women are also more likely to be sexually assaulted and to use violence only in self-defence. On the other hand, female perpetrators of domestic violence are less likely, and less able, to use controlling tactics over their partners.

One Man Every 10 Days?

Another claim made by the One In Three brats is that, “one male is a victim of domestic homicide every 10 days”. Incorrect. Wrong. Go directly to jail. Do not pass Go. Do not collect $200.

The NSW Coroner’s Court Domestic Violence Review Team recently published a report, which analysed 877 homicides, in NSW, between 2000-2010. In this report, they came to a number of conclusions:

  • 593 men and 283 women were killed in NSW.
  • 101 men and 137 women were killed in domestic violence-related incidents.
  • 108 women were killed by intimate partners, and 105 of these women were victims of domestic violence.
  • 35 men were killed by intimate partners, and 6 were domestic violence victims—killed by their male partner. 25 men were “identified as being the abuser of the woman who killed them”.

But here’s the real kicker: according to the NSW Coroners Court Domestic Violence Review Team (a.k.a the people who really know what they’re talking about), there were no cases where a woman was a domestic violence abuser who killed a male domestic violence victim

Check. Mate.

Are they really about helping men?

Do not get me wrong, fighting for awareness and support for male victims of domestic violence is a totally legitimate and necessary cause. However, One in Three is not here for this. The campaign is tied to anti-feminist and father’s rights groups like the Lone Father’s Association and the Men’s Right’s Agency. Despite attempts to appear unbiased and diplomatic, they ultimately show they are not a campaign for male victims of domestic violence in a number of ways.

  • One in Three claims that they are concerned about male domestic violence, but does not mention violence against males by other males, which is five times more likely than being assaulted by a female.
  • One in Three uses the term “family violence”, which allows them to speak in broad terms, often including numbers of violence between children and parents, and other family members, including adult female partners. There is a “blurred line” (I am so sorry) between male victims of family violence, and adult male victims of partner violence.
  • One in Three constantly degenders “highly gendered patterns of violence and the factors associated with violence”, according to Dr. Michael Flood. Gender analysis of domestic violence perpetrators is critical to understanding and preventing domestic violence, says Karen Willis, Executive Officer of Rape and Domestic Violence Services NSW. “If we are going to talk about prevention, and we take gender out, we will get nowhere because the perpetrators are always men”.
  • The organisation constantly undermines campaigns that address men’s violence against women. A whole section of their website is dedicated to debunking “misinformation” about violence against women. They spin and twist statistics for the sole purpose of detracting attention away from female victims, and to make the numbers of male victims seem greater.

Instead, it’s probably more beneficial for One in Three to take their attention away from the Evil Violent Women Harpies who prey on their Defenceless Man Lovers, and acknowledge that men are most at risk of physical and sexual violence from other males, both at home and in public. This is a serious issue that needs addressing.

One in Three also need to realise that acknowledging that women are overwhelmingly the victims of domestic abuse, does not take away from the fact that some men are victims of domestic abuse. It is possible to raise awareness for male victims without simultaneously creating some kind of morbid Suffering Olympics, downplaying one group’s suffering in order to prove that Men are Truly the Ones Who Suffer. If we as a society are going to constantly make feminist issues such as this (and yes, male victims of domestic violence is a feminist issue) a case of men vs. women, we are never going to get anywhere.

 

If you or someone you know (any and all genders) have experienced sexual assault or domestic violence, please contact one of these support services in NSW:

 

1800 RESPECT (1800 737 732): 24 hour, National Sexual Assault, Family & Domestic Violence Counselling Line for any Australian who has experienced, or is at risk of, family and domestic violence and/or sexual assault.

 

Lifeline has a national number who can help put you in contact with a crisis service in your State (24 hours)

131 114

website: www.lifeline.org.au

 

Mensline Australia 

Supports men and boys who are dealing with family and relationship difficulties

1300 78 99 78

 

Relationships Australia 

Support groups and counselling on relationships, and for abusive and abused partners.

1300-364-277 or Vic (03) 9261-8700. 

Website: www.relationships.com.au

 

Rape Crisis Service (NSW) 

1800 424 017

 

Edit: the original post stated that 1in3 is *totally* silent on domestic violence in homosexual relationships. That has since been redacted.

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About the Author

Nicole Archer

is a Juilliard-trained dermatologist and Xbox enthusiast/ button masher. In between watching re-runs of 30 Rock, Nicole studies history and can talk about 19th century medicine and doughnuts for days.



26 Responses to The One In Three Campaign is Bollocks, and Here is Why   

  1. Zoe says:

    Nicole, you’re so sassy. This is fabulous. Thanks for finally clearing the air!

  2. Shannon Archer says:

    criticism of a study that tries to distort facts is always good. however the lack of self awareness is staggering, not to mention the snide remarks regarding a group of people trying to gain some representation for an often ignored minority.

    I struggle to understand how taking a non-sexist approach to domestic violence can be twisted into a bad thing.

    • Nicole Archer says:

      Dear Mr. Archer,
      First of all, great name. Secondly, your comments have been received, and we thank you for your feedback. However, if you actually took the time to read the article, you would find that the 1in3 campaign isn’t really about “raising awareness for an often ignored minority”. You’ll see in the last section of the article that I explain the flaws of the campaign that shows they’re not *really* about “raising awareness for an often ignored minority”. I have included links to literature on the topic that further support my arguments.
      Thirdly, I agree! I also struggle to understand how taking a non-sexist approach to domestic violence can be twisted into a bad thing. Except this, the 1in3 campaign, is *not* a non-sexist approach. It’s important to remember that including *all genders* in an approach to issues like this does not make it inheritantly non-sexist. It is possible for campaigners to raise awareness for male victims of domestic abuse without constantly undermining statistics about(and the experiences of) female victims of domestic violence, which is what 1in3 do.
      Regards,
      Nicole Archer (see you at the family reunion)

      • Shannon Archer says:

        Thanks for the advice. Reading through it again, im unsure why i commented as this ‘article’ is obviously a close minded, childishly written opinion piece which I had missed in my initial read through. I must apologise, I mistook you for a journalist and held your article and the tertangala to the some standard of journalistic integrity.

        • Gemma Mollenhauer Gemma Mollenhauer says:

          Hey Shannon, I’m one of the co-editors of the print version of The Tertangala, and I just wanted to attempt to diffuse this a little. While we always appreciate feedback, name calling isn’t really okay. Everyone has every right to express their opinion, particularly so if there is research included. We do very much have a high standard of journalist integrity, but we also encourage individual opinions to be expressed- the banner of ‘opinion’ facilitates this.

          If you would like to write an informed rebuttal piece, so as to maintain an even handed view of the topic please don’t hesitate to email thetert@gmail.com. Thanks

          • Shannon Archer says:

            Hey Gemma,

            Thanks for the reply. I appreciate the lack of ‘sass’. I feel there was no name calling on my part, I meant to critique the articles style of writing and narrow mind set not the author herself but I will reword my replies in the future to be less harsh / misunderstood. To allow the author though to describe a group of men and women as “crying babies” and then disagree with what I’ve said for those reasons seems hypocritical however.

            Besides that, thanks for the offer to write a rebuttal piece, I’ll give it some thought after exams this session.

          • Anonymous says:

            If name calling is never ok, why does the article author call the members of One In Three “crying babies”?

          • Kris says:

            Gemma, you say you are a co-editor yet you allow this ‘opinion’ to be published on your page which states that a group, which aims to bring light to an abused population, are “a group of crying babies”.

            First and foremost, every person has rights. Every group has rights. Claiming that men don’t have rights is a flaw regardless of your opinion. Did you know that a little thing called the universal declaration of human rights was created to outline that all humans have inherent rights.

            You are journalists and your goal is to provide factual information in regards to current issues, not a plug for your gender charged rhetoric.

            If you disagreed with the article you would not have run it, so it’s safe to make the assumption that you in fact agree with it and are only using it as the means mentioned above.

            Shannons point of journalistic integrity is correct. If you really, REALLY, wanted to provide a fair and honest article then you would have both side of the story and not seek to discredit an organisation against abuse. Also you would have left out that nice little parks and rec gifs and ‘sass’.

  3. craig benno says:

    I’m a male victim of spousal abuse by a female. 1 in 3 was the org where I could tell my story. Have a read of my story here, https://mencanbeabusedtoo.wordpress.com/my-story-part-1/.

  4. Nathan says:

    Really eye opening article. I think a point a lot of the commenters are missing is that whilst domestic violence against men is obviously a serious problem, using false facts isn’t helping their cause, and betrays their derailing purpose. Also – the fact that men who are domestically abused are not believed or laughed at by society and even police is an issue of misogyny; men are forced into the stereotype of ‘strong’ and women are ‘weak’. It’s a harmful stereotype because people assume that strong men can’t get attacked by weak women, which obviously is incorrect, but the reason this stereotype exists is because of a historically embedded idea of male supremacy.

  5. Hello to all readers and commenters,

    The Tertangala is the University of Wollongong’s student run publication. As the co-Editor of this online publication I’d like to clarify some things. It was never anyone’s intention to trigger or harm people. This article is clearly categorised under the opinion/comment section, this was a specific editorial decision. The author should not have to deal with unnecessary negativity because her views differ from your own. If you would like to write in to us and pitch a rebuttal piece, please do, we love to cover these issues in a balanced way. In saying that I would like to reiterate that this article is thoroughly researched and does present facts. We are not attempting to disregard anyone’s experiences and I do believe that the author did make that clear in her article.

    As stated here: “One in Three also need to realise that acknowledging that women are overwhelmingly the victims of domestic abuse, does not take away from the fact that some men are victims of domestic abuse. It is possible to raise awareness for male victims without simultaneously creating some kind of morbid Suffering Olympics, downplaying one group’s suffering in order to prove that Men are Truly the Ones Who Suffer. If we as a society are going to constantly make feminist issues such as this (and yes, male victims of domestic violence is a feminist issue) a case of men vs. women, we are never going to get anywhere.”

    As co-Editor I felt as though the authors comments were not offensive and were in keeping with the nature of her argument. She did not attack any individuals, only the campaign. Summing up her article with support for all victims of domestic violence, and advocating that this support is directed towards all victims – without taking away from others.

    We do understand that violence against anyone (regardless of gender) is a serious issue. However the authors comments were directed towards the One in Three Campaign not domestic violence against men, just read the title. Our site will not foster any discussion that doesn’t facilitate healthy discussion of these topics. Again if you would like to pitch your own story, to the same standard of this, please feel free to do so. We love a debate, but in order for all parties to achieve something positive we ask that your comments are constructive and respectful.

    Regards,
    Georgia

  6. Pete Aitchison says:

    Hello.

    Incredibly sad to see comments like:

    “…which I imagine to be a group of crying babies”

    “…they are essentially a “campaign against efforts to address men’s violence against women”.

    I think everyone is entitled to raise their hand to add a voice to a specific sub-section of victims without being bullied, harassed, and ridiculed. Generally you find yourself backing a group because of personal experiences. Being a voice for one group doesn’t mean you believe other groups don’t deserve a voice as well, and care.

    Grand parents in home care can be victims. A sibling may be the cause of someone’s torment. Kids in foster care. Disabled people may be targeted. Domestic violence isn’t a gender issue. It’s a devastating societal problem and it doesn’t discriminate.

    At 15 I had to protect my mum from my father who had been on a psychotic screaming bender for three days solid. This was fairly regular. She was laying on the floor in the foetal position just broken, and a shell of her former self. Thank God for White Ribbon and other foundations these days that women can turn too for help. Back then you NEVER heard of those options. I wish she had it. I struggled with drugs, alcohol, and depression for a long time. One day I just needed help. I had to source my own. I found a counsellor whose first question was: “Do you believe in God?”. I stood up and walked out. It cost me a relationship, because I just couldn’t figure out what was wrong. I got there in the end, and now I want to help other men find a way out without having to experience what I did.

    I don’t believe that makes me a cry baby, and I definitely don’t want to see women get the help they deserve. Let’s stop domestic violence across the board. That’s a good thing to do, yeah?

    • Pete Aitchison says:

      Typo. My apologies. It should read…

      I definitely WANT to see women get the help…

      • Thanks for your comment Pete. I was saddened to hear your story but I think you are misconstruing what our author is actually saying. She is advocating for those who are victims of domestic violence regardless of their gender.

        As stated here: “One in Three also need to realise that acknowledging that women are overwhelmingly the victims of domestic abuse, does not take away from the fact that some men are victims of domestic abuse. It is possible to raise awareness for male victims without simultaneously creating some kind of morbid Suffering Olympics, downplaying one group’s suffering in order to prove that Men are Truly the Ones Who Suffer. If we as a society are going to constantly make feminist issues such as this (and yes, male victims of domestic violence is a feminist issue) a case of men vs. women, we are never going to get anywhere.”

        As co-Editor I felt as though the authors comments were not offensive and were in keeping with the nature of her argument. She did not attack any individuals, only the campaign. Summing up her article with support for all victims of domestic violence, and advocating that this support is directed towards all victims – without taking away from others.

        Best,
        Georgia

  7. sydney mgtow says:

    All violence is wrong. Gender based ANYTHING is wrong (when it effects both genders.. Irrespective of the amount who cops it worse) and misandry is a very real thing that women don’t want to admit to. 1 in 3 exists cos the story is one sided and it needs balancing.

    Im not sorry to tell all you women out there.. that your gynocentric nature is now on full display for the world to see.. and you are losing your power.. little by little… and we can see right through you – you don’t like it. cry me a river please.

    keep up the good fight 1 in 3!

    mgtow for life. men’s right activism for life! To all the men out there… google mgtow and see through the matrix

    • Alice Clarke says:

      I think this comment really shows what we are dealing with when we talk about ‘mens rights activism’ and ‘one in three’.

  8. Rebecca says:

    Look, if they have to base their entire organisation on a straight out LIE, how is anyone supposed to take them seriously? The author has shown, and I personally have read the study, that the ‘1 in 3’ is based on, and it’s NOT TRUE. Not only that, but they organisation constantly makes the assumption that because their ‘1 in 3’ is male, that means that 1 in 3 perpetrators is female. Again, hella wrong! They don’t take into account at ALL that homosexuality exists, because that same study they base it on shows that nearly 90% of perpetrators are men. Yes, dudes, it is possible for a gay man to domestically abuse another gay man. AND ON TOP OF THAT – as the author stated, they also use statistics from ‘family violence’ , so they can say ‘women are mean and abusive to men’, use a statistic saying this many males are abused, whilst counting times a 11 year old was beaten up by an abusive parent (usually a father !)
    So no, we are not going to take your organisation (and by this I don’t mean abused men) seriously, when the entire premise of their argument is false.

    • Alice Clarke says:

      I am with you Tertangala. I agree, One in Three is a lie and their propaganda is misogynist. Their latest poster series is currently being used by ‘A Voice For Men’ – Whose ‘leader’, Paul Elam, urges his followers to ‘Bash a Violent Bitch’. Anyone with a basic understanding of how images are used for propaganda can see why A voice for men chose to use 1 in 3’s poster campaign.
      As a victim of Domestic Violence who closely follows the unfortunate misogyny as a guise for ‘mens’ rights’ found on 1 in three, A voice for men and other related internet campaigns- my opinion is that one in three to be the number one cause for concern for women experiencing intimate partner violence – after violent men themselves. Their propaganda is the kind of stuff that violent abusers seize upon to further subjugate their victims into believing no one will believe them. One in three need to be stopped – dead – in -their- tracks -NOW. Before they do any more damage to victims of intimate partner violence both male and female. No to Violence has this one. Not one in three. What amazes me is just how sinister these people are- they level of organisation and the depths they will sink to intimidate female victims of intimate partner violence and those that support them. Thanks Tertangula. (And yes you are currently being raided by the flying monkeys – but don’t give in – you’ve done the right thing and your article was great.)

  9. Andrew Baguley says:

    “I would like to reiterate that this article is thoroughly researched and does present facts”(Georgia Holloway, co-editor). Referencing 9 year old 2006 ABS data instead of the 2012 version to which ‘One In Three’ refer hardly constitutes thorough research, and is a deliberate
    attempt to distort facts and mislead readers. ‘One in Three’ point only to the most current research from Australia’s most reputable source, the Australian Bureau of Statistics to substantiate their claims. If the author takes issue with any of the data, then I suggest she direct her dissatisfaction towards the ABS.

  10. Alice Clarke says:

    am with you Tertangala. I agree, One in Three is a lie and their propaganda is misogynist. Their latest poster series is currently being used by ‘A Voice For Men’ – Whose ‘leader’, Paul Elam, urges his followers to ‘Bash a Violent Bitch’. Anyone with a basic understanding of how images are used for propaganda can see why A voice for men chose to use 1 in 3’s poster campaign.
    As a victim of Domestic Violence who closely follows the unfortunate misogyny as a guise for ‘mens’ rights’ found on 1 in three, A voice for men and other related internet campaigns- my opinion is that one in three to be the number one cause for concern for women experiencing intimate partner violence – after violent men themselves. Their propaganda is the kind of stuff that violent abusers seize upon to further subjugate their victims into believing no one will believe them. One in three need to be stopped – dead – in -their- tracks -NOW. Before they do any more damage to victims of intimate partner violence both male and female. No to Violence has this one. Not one in three. What amazes me is just how sinister these people are- they level of organisation and the depths they will sink to intimidate female victims of intimate partner violence and those that support them. Thanks Tertangula. (And yes you are currently being raided by the flying monkeys – but don’t give in – you’ve done the right thing and your article was great.)

    • Lisi says:

      Absolutely agree. Well said. I’m so tired of MRAs trolling pages talking about ‘misandry’ and the ‘gynocracy’. It’s been said before and I’ll say it again: “Have some cheese with your sour grapes and whine boys”.

  11. Alice Clarke says:

    Can I also add to Pete Atchison that my understanding is that White Ribbon does not help female victims of domestic violence. It is not a support service. It aims to address sexist attitudes of men that contribute to violence toward women by engaging…men. They have a lot of work to do!!

  12. Lisi says:

    Thank you Nicole for shedding some well needed light on 1in3, who are nothing but a misogynistic MRA group trying to hide behind shoddy ‘statistics’. At their heart, they are a group angry that men are excluded from the dollars of what they call the ‘domestic violence industry’. Their attempts to mainstream themselves have been stopped at every turn, thank goodness.

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